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Harold Wolpe Texts - Political Economy

Text

Year

From

Abstract

Capitalism and Cheap Labour-power in South Africa:
From Segregation to Apartheid

1995

Segregation and Apartheid in Twentieth Century South Africa

Conventionally, Apartheid is regarded as no more that an intensification of the earlier policy of Segregation and is ascribed simplistically to the particular racial ideology of the ruling Nationalist Party.
In this article substantial differences between Apartheid and Segregation are identified and explained by reference to the changing relations of capitalist and African pre-capitalist modes of production. The supply of African migrant labour power, at a wage below its cost of reproduction, is a function of the existence of the pre-capitalist mode. The dominant capitalist mode of production tends to dissolve the pre-capitalist mode thus threatening the conditions of reproduction of cheap migrant labour-power and thereby generating intense conflict against the system of Segregation. In these conditions Segregation gives way to Apartheid which provides the specific mechanism for maintaining labour-power cheap through the elaboration of the entire system of domination and control and the transformation of the function of the pre-capitalist societies.

The Debate on University Transformation in South Africa: the case of the University of the Western Cape 1995 Comparative Education
Vol 31 No 2
This paper examines issues in the transformation of the university system in a democratic South Africa utilising the University of the Western Cape as a case study. In particular, it questions how the University’s 1982 Mission Statement, which defined its oppositional role in the apartheid period, might be revised to shape the universities radical traditions to the tasks of the contribution of a new social order.

The Uneven Transition from Apartheid in South Africa

1995

Transformation,
27:88-101

 

The Post-Secondary Education System: Towards Policy Formulation for Equality and Development 1994 Changing by Degrees? Equity issues in South African tertiary education
 

The Post-Secondary Education System: Towards Policy Formulation for Equality and Development

1993

Education Policy Unit, Working Paper No. 1

 
A Perspective on Quality and Inequality in South African University Education 1993 Education Policy Unit
Working Paper No. 2
 
Education and Social Transformation: Problems and Dilemmas 1991 Education in a Future South Africa: Policy issues for transformation
pp3-16
 
Reproduction, Reform and Transformation: Approaches to the analysis of education in South Africa 1991 Apartheid Education and Popular Struggles  
Three Theses on People's Education 1990 RESA
Occasional Paper No. 5
 

Class Concepts, Class Struggles and Racism

1986

Theories of race and ethnic relations,
pp110-130

 

The Liberation Struggle and Research

1985

Review of African Political Economy,
32:72-78

 

Apartheid's Deepening Crisis

1983

Marxism Today, January 1983,
pp7-11

 

Towards an Analysis of the South African State

1980

International Journal of the Sociology of Law,
8:399-421

 

Capitalism and Cheap Labour-power in South Africa:
From Segregation to Apartheid

1980


The Articulation of Modes of Production,
Introduction and pp289-320

Conventionally, Apartheid is regarded as no more that an intensification of the earlier policy of Segregation and is ascribed simplistically to the particular racial ideology of the ruling Nationalist Party.
In this article substantial differences between Apartheid and Segregation are identified and explained by reference to the changing relations of capitalist and African pre-capitalist modes of production. The supply of African migrant labour power, at a wage below its cost of reproduction, is a function of the existence of the pre-capitalist mode. The dominant capitalist mode of production tends to dissolve the pre-capitalist mode thus threatening the conditions of reproduction of cheap migrant labour-power and thereby generating intense conflict against the system of Segregation. In these conditions Segregation gives way to Apartheid which provides the specific mechanism for maintaining labour-power cheap through the elaboration of the entire system of domination and control and the transformation of the function of the pre-capitalist societies.

The Theory of Internal Colonialism:
The South African Case

1975

Beyond the Sociology of Development:
Economy and Society in Latin America and Africa, pp229-252

 

Capitalism and Cheap Labour-power in South Africa:
From Segregation to Apartheid

1972

Economy and Society,
Vol 1 No 4 pp425-456

Conventionally, Apartheid is regarded as no more that an intensification of the earlier policy of Segregation and is ascribed simplistically to the particular racial ideology of the ruling Nationalist Party.
In this article substantial differences between Apartheid and Segregation are identified and explained by reference to the changing relations of capitalist and African pre-capitalist modes of production. The supply of African migrant labour power, at a wage below its cost of reproduction, is a function of the existence of the pre-capitalist mode. The dominant capitalist mode of production tends to dissolve the pre-capitalist mode thus threatening the conditions of reproduction of cheap migrant labour-power and thereby generating intense conflict against the system of Segregation. In these conditions Segregation gives way to Apartheid which provides the specific mechanism for maintaining labour-power cheap through the elaboration of the entire system of domination and control and the transformation of the function of the pre-capitalist societies.

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